America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

Jun 06

America’s Failing Water Infrastructure: There are Ways We Can Begin to Fix It

There are many variables threatening America’s water from pollution issues and aging infrastructure to raising costs and droughts and rainfall patterns as the climate changes. The U.S. used to be a leader when it came to water infrastructure and management. Now, the U.S. is lagging behind receiving D ratings for dams, drinking water and wastewater. It’s time to start focuses on possible solutions to curb these issues – the U.S. can get A ratings and below are some of the solutions that may get the nation where it needs to be. It starts with creating a national-level governance. Water technically has no boundaries and is very good at sometimes ignoring the municipal boundaries it does have. So what does this mean? One town’s water use or sewage can affect other cities or states that rely on the same water supply. That’s why many countries have a national water authority or commission that oversees water management across the country. The U.S. does not and we’re exactly the opposite. Our nation’s water supply is managed by individual municipalities each doing their own thing. This creates numerous hurdles to climb and makes it difficult to initiate and complete regional projects. To do almost anything, there needs to be a budget and that’s the case with water infrastructure. The government spends only two percent of its GDP on infrastructure, and water infrastructure makes up just a part of that. The U.S. is spending less than Vietnam, Mexico, and Chile. If the U.S. wants nice things, like a water infrastructure that does not fail us, then the U.S. has to be willing to pay for them. One possible solution that most do not consider is the private investor sector. Many investors are interested in investing in water-related issues, but they want to know more about the social and environmental effects their investments will have. The problem is that there are a lot of inconsistencies in how companies report these estimates. It has been suggested that investors, academics and regulators need to team up to create a standardized system of evaluating the impacts of sustainable investments. Another challenge is getting investors to understand how complex and important water is, since it affects agriculture and many...

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Florida’s Lagoon and Wetlands: Ecological Adherence

Apr 25

Florida’s Lagoon and Wetlands: Ecological Adherence

Florida has many areas of water that can become polluted; requiring residents to make an increased effort on behalf of the environment. Rivers and streams drain into estuaries, bringing in nutrients from uplands. As long as nutrient-rich freshwater flows and tides interact without interference, estuaries will remain productive. Today, they remain one of our greatest natural resources. If you live along the estuary, there are several ways residents can be proactive.  There are ongoing volunteer efforts in place to ensure heedful practices on behalf of coastal and marine ecology. Additionally, it is suggested that homeowners inspect their septic tanks. Brevard County has approximately 100,000 tanks. All totaled, there are an estimated 300,000 septic tanks in the five-county area bordering the Lagoon.  Roughly 30 years ago, there were 46 sewer plants along the 156 miles of the Indian River Lagoon, resulting in discharges of up to 55,000,000 gallons daily into the estuary. However, when septic tanks fail, it can lead to ecological problems as well.  The Lagoon can sustain large amounts of algae due to heavy rains forming a layer of low density water which can persist for months. The result wreaks havoc on life forms in the Lagoon.  Other best practices for homeowners include watching where you mow, fertilize and use pesticides. A good rule of thumb is to keep a distance of at least ten feet from the water, helping to protect the estuaries from organic matter.  The Quality Assurance Project Plans, which have been implemented within the State, continue on the estuaries throughout South Florida, as well as, the wetlands in Jacksonville. Certified Installers take note: Perma-Liner Industries would like to invite you to our Refresher Training (Perma-Lateral™ specific) that will take place on July 12th and 13th at our Clearwater facility!! Please plan on attending. Register by calling 1-866-336-2568 or Click Here!  See you...

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