Miami’s Heedful Preparation for Hurricane Season

May 09

Miami’s Heedful Preparation for Hurricane Season

Here in South Florida, it’s always a good idea to be prepared as hurricane season is just around the corner. Of course, this all depends on the climate patterns, but knowing what to do is just one way of being ready… just in case. Interestingly, the Category 3 or above storms are associated with wind speeds of over 100 miles per hour and are capable of causing extreme damage. There are certain criteria when it comes to determining the levels of a hurricane. For instance, a season with an accumulated cyclone energy of 130, would most often mean a season of six to eight hurricanes, with two to three reaching major status. With hurricane season officially beginning at the first of June, several climate factors will continue to be monitored and analyzed. Another major factor is the cycle of warming and cooling of the surface of the North Atlantic Ocean. Warm ocean water is the essential stimulus for hurricanes. For residents in the Miami area, proper planning is advisable in any event. It is suggested that storing water before a storm is important because of the possibility of contamination of the drinking water supply. When electrical power is lost due to a storm, water utilities cannot operate the pumps that maintain water pressure in the pipes that travel to your home. Maintaining that pressure is one way water utilities ensure that your water is free from harmful bacteria. When the pressure is lost, a boil-water order may be issued by health authorities. If you choose to use water directly from the tap after the storm passes, make sure you have an adequate supply of coffee filters. The filters will help remove any cloudiness you may see in the water after a hurricane hits. If the water from your tap is cloudy, pour it through a fresh coffee filter until the cloudiness is gone. Having a minimum of one gallon of water per person, per day for at least three days is best. Interesting fact: accumulated cyclone energy uses a portion of the wind energy used by a tropical system over its lifetime and is calculated every six-hour...

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Miami’s Solutions to Guard against Infrastructure Damage and Climate Change

Mar 01

Miami’s Solutions to Guard against Infrastructure Damage and Climate Change

The city of Miami has demonstrated remarkable resiliency for sewer infrastructures in the Southeast region of Florida. As a coastal city with strong geographical growth constraints, Miami is already experiencing the effects of climate change, including frequent tidal floods. The city is planning a Sea-Level Rise Pilot Program that will use geographic information system data to strengthen innovation and resources for the residents of the city. The geology and topography of Miami make groundwater issues particularly challenging, making flooding issues problematic and frequent. Because of this, strategic and advanced planning becomes a necessity. With the vulnerability of critical infrastructure, a planning committee, a task force of sorts, has been put in place to best prepare for hurricanes and flooding. The committee is expected to become available in all 34 cities in Miami-Dade County. This agenda will be used as a strengthening mechanism for many infrastructures within the city and will help manage coastal areas. Organizing greenTop of FormBottom of Form infrastructure along the coastline is part of the initiative, as well as understanding how green infrastructure like sand dunes, coral reefs and mangroves can reduce potential damages due to storm surge. What appears to be minor flooding can have a big impact on drainage and water flows, primarily due to the very flat terrain. Miami Beach—where flooding impacts have been more pressing—has self-financed investment in flood pumps and elevating roads. This accommodation required raising sewer fees in certain areas of the city. However, residents have been receptive to Miami’s efforts in implementing coastal infrastructure protection measures. The agenda is also expected to be a helpful tool for the economic stability of the region. Miami continues to be viewed as a trendsetter on sea-level rise and climate change solutions. Interesting fact: A house built above storm surge height will make the property more resilient when facing long-term risks from higher sea...

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Miami’s Shifting Sea Wall Elevation and Waterfront Homes

Jun 23

Miami’s Shifting Sea Wall Elevation and Waterfront Homes

In Miami, many tourists and residents alike find the charm of the city has a pull of its own.  An array of pleasing characteristics make Miami an ideal place to reside. While beautiful homes surround waterfront lots, there are important factors to consider when looking into local real estate. A question that one may ask: does the street flood during extreme tides? The city is part of a region where climate change will fuel sea-level rise by as much as 10 inches, over the levels of decades ago, by 2030. So ‘will it flood?’ is a buyer’s question. South Florida is home to 6 million people and is projected to grow by 3 million over the next three decades. Most of the estimates of growth rely on the continued enticement of the beaches, waterways and natural environment. Yet, by 2050, an estimated $15 billion to $36 billion of Florida’s coastal property will be threatened by sea-level rise. Additionally, climate change has a role to play, particularly for the resources of roads and sewer lines in low-lying areas, and storm and flood insurance rates. Residents, for those reasons, are now looking for reassurance that their investments will be secure. Many are beginning to realize that protecting people and property from more intense storms, higher temperatures and sea-level rise will require a massive investment in ideas and infrastructure. Currently there are changes to base flood elevation requirements with increases to sea wall elevation. Developers have started marketing storm-resistant homes and resilient buildings, such as a high-rise in downtown Miami designed to withstand 300-mph winds. Coming soon: Perma-Liner Industries is busy making plans for you. We’re planning a Trenchless Tour on July 27th in the New England area. We’ll be posting more information on this spectacular event…stay tuned! Click here to...

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Flow Equalization and the Everglades Restoration

Mar 09

Flow Equalization and the Everglades Restoration

Flow equalization basins provide a more steady flow of water to storm water treatment areas, helping to maintain desired water levels needed to achieve optimal water quality treatment performance.  The A-1 Flow Equalization Basin (FEB) is part of several ongoing projects in the State of Florida’s $880 million Restoration Strategies plan, all designed to improve water quality in the Everglades. A flow equalization basin is a constructed storage feature used to capture and store peak storm water flows. The A-1 FEB is capable of storing 20 billion gallons of water, enough to fill 45,000 football fields one foot deep.  The A-1 will also contain vegetation to help reduce phosphorus concentrations before moving water to the storm water treatment areas (constructed wetlands) that serve as the water-cleaning workhorses by removing nutrients from the water that flows into the Everglades. Biscayne Bay is part of the restoration effort and a large Florida ecosystem which also relies upon water that flows directly from the Everglades.  Of the many benefits of this project, it will serve to maximize water quality improvement abilities.  Construction is underway on the $59.9 million project, which includes levees, water control structures, collection and conveyance canals and pump station upgrades. Miami, have you registered yet for the NASTT’s No-Dig Show? It’s being held this month in Dallas. The NASTT No-Dig show is the largest trenchless technology conference in North America. Professionals attend to learn new techniques that will save money and improve infrastructure. We’ll have many fascinating, informative demo’s on the latest trenchless technologies along with exhibits, products and resources on all of our services locally and nationwide. You won’t want to miss it! Location: Gaylord Texan Hotel & Convention Center/ March 20th-24th 1501 Gaylord Trail Grapevine, TX...

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The Florida Lawn: What’s Required?

Feb 10

The Florida Lawn: What’s Required?

Proper lawn maintenance is vital for the long-term health of your lawn. Appropriate mowing and watering practices must occur so your lawn will have a healthy root system, be more drought-tolerant and be able to resist pests and disease.  Practicing a few guidelines will keep your lawn maintained well. When mowing, be sure not to remove more than one-third of the leaf blade at any one time. Cutting too much of the leaf blade can stress your lawn. If your grass is under any stress (shade, traffic, drought, etc.), raise the mowing height. Mowing at low heights can result in a shallow root system. Keep your mower blades sharp. A dull blade tears the grass blades, making the grass unattractive and prone to an influx of insects or disease. Do not mow when grass is wet. This is unsafe for you, tough on the mower and bad for the grass. If you miss a weekly mowing, raise the mower height so you do not remove too much of the grass blade. Bring the height back down to the recommended level gradually over the next few weeks. Keep grass clippings, vegetative material and vegetative debris away from storm drains, ditches, water bodies and roadways. Leave grass clippings on the ground as they return nutrients and organic matter back to the lawn. Regardless of the season, grass needs no more than one half to three quarters inch of water each time you irrigate. In the winter months, grass growth is less active and may need to be watered every 10 to 14 days. Miami, did you know? Single family homeowners are eligible for a free evaluation of your in-ground irrigation system as part of the Landscape Irrigation Project sponsored by the Miami-Dade County Water Use Efficiency...

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